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The Napoleonic Wars 1792-1815

ARTICLE | The Infantry (Baker) Rifle

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Re: ARTICLE | The Infantry (Baker) Rifle

Postby Bobsentry » March 8th, 2014, 12:47 pm

Hi
The easiest thing to check out are,
Stock keepers stamp right side of stock upper left by patch box
Small crown and number on stock by rear of trigger guard view mark on inside of brass trigger guard
Large number stamped inside patch box
Stock maker name in ramrod channel
Some or all of these present will point towards it being original if this is a genuine pre 1823 baker it is extremely rare and would be very valuable.
Regards Bob
History is a window we can only look through
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Re: ARTICLE | The Infantry (Baker) Rifle

Postby terry1956 » June 4th, 2014, 2:31 pm

hi, sorry in reply. the last time I was there. They had on display. officers green jacket, baker rifle complete with sword bayonet. Apart from that it was very thin on the ground. I have placed a pic on showing my first pattern baker, you will note that the sword bayonet mounting has been removed and the foresight moved back to enable a socket bayonet to be used. This mod was undertaken in 1824 to a few hundred rifles. the baker ended service in the British army around 1828.michael
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Re: ARTICLE | The Infantry (Baker) Rifle

Postby A.Roads » June 5th, 2014, 9:35 pm

Hi Michael, yes I was under the impression that they (The RGJ Museum) did not have any original 95th Regt O.R's items, from what I understand virtually nothing with irrefutable provenence has survived. I think you will find that their rifle is "HH" marked, usually ascribed to the Hompesch Hussars. However there are 14 buttons scattered across about 6 collections, a rifle in the north U.S. & presumably some other items do survive, there are a few sword bayonets that are quite likely but not definite & a horn in an American museum that is a high probability.

That is a nice rifle that you have, these were altered in 1815 & take a pattern 1815 socket bayonet. I would estimate that one would see about 3 or 4 altered rifles to every 1 that is still in original configuration. Yet their sword bayonets are quite common whilst the P/1815 socket bayonets are rare. I do not recall reading a reference to there being a few hundred rifles converted in 1824 and this interests me greatly, can you please advise where you read that? as I don't think I have it. I find it especially interesting as the final model was the 1823 Infantry rife, where they reverted back to the sword bayonet, plus a few minor changes, so there must have been a reason for a retrograde reversion one year later of a few hundred rifles. Adrian
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Re: ARTICLE | The Infantry (Baker) Rifle

Postby terry1956 » June 6th, 2014, 12:06 pm

HI, THE REF IS FROM BRITISH MILITARY FIREARMS 1650-1850. you will also see two Paget carbines in the pic. the top one is from the late SM Cottons museum, so as he took weapons from the battlefield, this Paget must of been at Waterloo. the second lower Paget as the Manton percussion conversion. known at the time as the 6th Paget carbine. Manton converted a large number of Pagets around 1847. also up for conversion was the Elliot carbine which was cut down and converted. This may account why so few Elliot pattern carbines are seen on the market today.michael
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Re: ARTICLE | The Infantry (Baker) Rifle

Postby A.Roads » June 9th, 2014, 2:18 am

Hi Michael, I think there is confusion here with dates & numbers so I cross checked with that reference. The P/1815 modifications were carried out up to 1820 and the new P/1823 rifle reverted back to the sword bayonet. Also the Baker rifle was used in the army well beyond 1828, with the last batch being set up in 1838 & also the Brunswick rifle, which eventually superseded the Baker, did not begin production until 1837/1838.
The Paget carbine is a nice piece, can you please post a photo of the reverse side showing its suspension ring arrangement etc? Does it have unit markings on it? Regards, Adrian.
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Re: ARTICLE | The Infantry (Baker) Rifle

Postby terry1956 » June 9th, 2014, 11:52 am

In reply.yes you maybe right re dates.i was just going by memory. There are no suspension rings on the carbines. The rings must of been removed at some point over the years to allow display. My french carbine is also missing these fittings.michael
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