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The Napoleonic Wars 1792-1815

The 33rd Regt. of Foot at Waterloo 1815.

For all discussions relating to the Hundred Days and Napoleon's final defeat at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815.

Re: The 33rd Regt. of Foot at Waterloo 1815.

Postby 348 White » June 14th, 2015, 9:14 pm

The unit's light company were detached in a composite light brigade and not with their parent unit at QB.
Possibly 5th Division suffered from being split at this battle as elements were needed to prop up two different allied formations.
The 33rd initially stood firm against the cavalry, but isolated in square on high ground suffered heavily from French artillery (two batteries or five guns , depending on whose account you believe). The unit broke, possibly while trying to change formation, with the threat of cavalry whilst flinching backwards towards the woods(possibly a colour was briefly lost and rescued if you believe a later narrative). Some men were ridden down and some captured though a charge by Brunswick cavalry allowed enough distraction for at least one prisoner to escape.
Elphinstone is portrayed as dithering and clueless during the crisis by Dawson Kelly of the 73rd, but is a brave, inspiring commander whilst in action according to one of his own officers!Perhaps tellingly, Mcready believed that the Brigade would have moved further in the final advanced if C. Halkett had remained with the Brigade (Elphinstone was the senior officer after Halkett had to quit the field due to his wounds).
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Re: The 33rd Regt. of Foot at Waterloo 1815.

Postby 348 White » June 30th, 2015, 7:22 pm

Several 33rd eyewitness accounts survive, many are now published in Gareth Glover's essential reference works. Some , that I know of, still need transcribing and/or publishing, but here are ones that have seen print somewhere (rank given is at time of Waterloo)~ Barring brief letters to Siborne, here are a few...

Pvt George Hemingway (letter)
Ass Surgeon Donald Finlayson (letters)
Colour Sgt Grey (several letters)
Ensign James Arnott Howard (letter)
Ensign William Thain (letters and journal)
Lieut Frederick Hope Pattison (letters and journal)
Lieut Samuel Alexander Pagan
Capt Orrok (retired): Includes letter relating to Belgium just before the campaign commenced and also includes letters from some 33rd officers written in earlier years, but referring to operations in Northern Europe over 1813-14.

Plus a letter was written by a militia officer some years after the campaign purporting to record the exploits of Corporal Holdsworth.

Various trophies of war, bits of uniform and equipment and Waterloo medals belong to the 33rd's officers and NCOs can be found at Bankfield, along with Howard's bullet pierced cap (shako). His campaign map still survives in the NAM.
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Re: The 33rd Regt. of Foot at Waterloo 1815.

Postby jf42 » June 30th, 2015, 7:49 pm

Here are details of an exhibition at the museum of The Duke of Wellington's Regimental Museum.

http://www.nam.ac.uk/whats-on/waterloo- ... ...content
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Re: The 33rd Regt. of Foot at Waterloo 1815.

Postby Mark » July 1st, 2015, 9:01 am

Doesn't member GemmaHist belong to the 33rd Regiment re-enactment group? If so, she may have access to a mine of information.

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Mark Simner BA (Hons) MSc | Web: http://marksimner.me.uk | Twitter @marksimner
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Re: The 33rd Regt. of Foot at Waterloo 1815.

Postby Waterloo Man » July 1st, 2015, 1:19 pm

Joseph, I've got a database that lists all 31,000 British combatants at Waterloo, and I've currently got birthplaces for 2/3rds of the men in the 33rd. (I'm working on the rest!)
While many regiments contained little connection to their "county name" - the West Riding actually contained a majority of men from Yorks. Of the 405 men listed with a birthplace (from 645) 207 were from Yorkshire. Unsurprisingly, Lancashire is the second highest county with 34 men.

Of the 207 Yorkshiremen on record the most common towns are Halifax, Leeds, Bradford, and Sheffield with 25, 23, 19, and 18 men each respectively.

I hope this helps, let me know if I can help with any other questions.

Regards
Martin
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Re: The 33rd Regt. of Foot at Waterloo 1815.

Postby 348 White » July 1st, 2015, 6:07 pm

Mark wrote:Doesn't member GemmaHist belong to the 33rd Regiment re-enactment group? If so, she may have access to a mine of information.

Mark

Gem' is indeed in the unit, like myself.
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Re: The 33rd Regt. of Foot at Waterloo 1815.

Postby 348 White » July 1st, 2015, 6:31 pm

Waterloo Man wrote:Joseph, I've got a database that lists all 31,000 British combatants at Waterloo, and I've currently got birthplaces for 2/3rds of the men in the 33rd. (I'm working on the rest!)
While many regiments contained little connection to their "county name" - the West Riding actually contained a majority of men from Yorks. Of the 405 men listed with a birthplace (from 645) 207 were from Yorkshire. Unsurprisingly, Lancashire is the second highest county with 34 men.

Of the 207 Yorkshiremen on record the most common towns are Halifax, Leeds, Bradford, and Sheffield with 25, 23, 19, and 18 men each respectively.

I hope this helps, let me know if I can help with any other questions.

Regards
Martin


Pvt John Ramsden, KIA with the 33rd, a former weaver from Halifax is on my family tree.
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Re: The 33rd Regt. of Foot at Waterloo 1815.

Postby Waterloo Man » July 2nd, 2015, 9:17 am

348 White
John Ramsden was one of 5 Halifax men in Number 2 company
Privates John Ramsden, Elijah Carter, Benjamin Denton, John Hartley and Drummer John Ackroyd.

Ramsden and Carter were both killed 18th June and Ackroyd was wounded.
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Re: The 33rd Regt. of Foot at Waterloo 1815.

Postby geegeewaterloo » January 21st, 2016, 10:48 am

Hi there

I am always intrigued when I spy mention of unpublished Peninsular/Waterloo accounts. If you have any that you know I haven't done yet, then please could you let me know where they are/references or even better, if you have copies perhaps you would be kind enough to e mail me copies?
I know I said Volume 6 was my last, but that was publisher led, so if I can find the material for volumes 7/8 I would definitely go for them. In fact I already have a number of accounts in hand but the more the merrier.

I do keep searching for accounts and I still have numerous that I am working on, but I am always grateful for leads, especially from those who are real experts on the material available from specific regimental museums which are often not available online.

Gareth Glover

:D
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Re: The 33rd Regt. of Foot at Waterloo 1815.

Postby MarkW » January 21st, 2016, 5:09 pm

Keep up the great work Gareth, due to all of your work, plus a few others like Andrew, people like me can really get into the detail in a much greater and more academic fashion - cheers

strange seeing you here as i was thinking of you this morning Gareth when reading Shaw-Kennedy's tale of Waterloo as he never mentioned any door in the south wall of LHS leading to the orchard - yes, the small details for debate :) ...hope you and yours all well.

Mark W
PS where do you think the Picton memorial should actually be placed?
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