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The Napoleonic Wars 1792-1815

Belgium

For all discussions relating to the aftermath and legacies of the Napoleonic Wars.

Re: Belgium

Postby TheBibliophile » January 29th, 2016, 11:03 am

Almost right then :D
I didnt realise that the Cantos were a remnant of the Napoleonic era.
Its fair to say though that Belgium is very loosely federated?
There was talk of the structure of the country on the news over here after the Paris attacks in November
They were trying to blame the federated structure for lack of coordinated action against this IS/ISIL mob.

Ive never been to Belgium, wanted to come to Waterloo a few years ago but my interest now is more Naval.
I would like to come in the next few years and am learning French at nightschool in preparation for that and also a trip to Rochefort this summer to see The replica French Frigate, La Hermione at the Corderie Royale.
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Re: Belgium

Postby Dominique T. » January 29th, 2016, 11:49 am

Yes, almost. ;)

The problem is that the federalisation was done under the pressure of Flemish nationalists, whose aim is an independant Flanders. A bit like Catalunia.

The other problem is that it is an ongoing process. Nobody knows in what direction it will go. However, recent polls have indicated that even politicians are now realising they have gone to far.

I don't think that federalisation has anything to do with the IS/ISIL threat, since all forces busy with that (Police, Homeland/State Security, Army) are still federal, i.e. centralised. Far more than e.g. in Germany.

The main cause for that, according to me, is a great laxness by socialist burgomasters (e.g. Brussels, Molenbeek), which is ongoing since decennia. They hoped immigrants would vote for them, so they let them do anything to please them.

Anyhow, you are welcome.
Belgium isn't a naval country, so there aren't that many museums on the subject, but you have an interesting Museum on the Scheldt in Antwerp. (It's just next to the... Bonaparte dock!)
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Re: Belgium

Postby TheBibliophile » January 29th, 2016, 12:29 pm

Bonaparte Dock :D
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Re: Belgium

Postby Dominique T. » January 29th, 2016, 1:25 pm

It was built in 1811.
https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonapartedok
The one next to it is the Willem dock.

So everyone is satisfied. :mrgreen:
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Re: Belgium

Postby TheBibliophile » January 29th, 2016, 1:50 pm

Dominique T. wrote:It was built in 1811.
https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonapartedok
The one next to it is the Willem dock.

So everyone is satisfied. :mrgreen:


I like that. :D
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Re: Belgium

Postby DaveH » January 29th, 2016, 2:18 pm

Dominique T. wrote: The Flemish-speaking people were, just like the Walloons, catholics. The 1798-99 uprising (Boerenkrijg = peasants war) had the same causes as in the Vendée or Tyrol : the French Revolution had taken away the catholic priests and was heavier in Flanders than in Wallonia.... There were nearly NO protestants in Flanders, for the simple reason that the border between Belgium and the Netherlands was exactly the limit between the protestant/Dutch north and the catholic/Belgian/Flemish South.


I stand corrected - I should have got to know a Flemish girl I met in in 91 better! Explains why they did not break away.
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Re: Belgium

Postby Josh&Historyland » January 29th, 2016, 4:13 pm

I read recently that there was much Belgian national sentiment in 1815, partly due to their being parcelled out to the Dutch, which they were none too pleased about and the subsequent drive to keep apart tended to overshadow their remembrance of the Waterloo campaign.
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Re: Belgium

Postby Andrew » January 29th, 2016, 7:58 pm

I know Dominique has already pointed out that a large number of Belgians fought with the French and there were some desertions to the French. French memoirs also speak of the enthusiastic welcome they received in Charleroi and some of the villages. In deed, all the first hand accounts of those who retreated through Namur with Grouchy, even after the defeat of Waterloo, comment on how welcoming the towns people were and the extent to which they brought out food and wine and looked after the wounded. General Teste's account is typical;

'The inhabitants of Namur proved in these circumstances, in the most unequivocal way, that they were worthy of being French. The Namurois of all ages and both sexes, rushed to carry refreshments for the troops on the ramparts and in the streets, in the middle of the fire.'

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Re: Belgium

Postby TheBibliophile » January 29th, 2016, 8:26 pm

I did chortle at the bit about english historians only using english sources as they dont understand other languages:
http://www.napolun.com/mirror/napoleoni ... wards.html
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