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Napoleon's travel case found in American library

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Napoleon's travel case found in American library

Postby FBC-Elvas, Portugal » November 24th, 2015, 7:49 pm

For the first time in 50 years, a library in New York State has a real historical treasure on display. It's a travel case which once belonged to Napoleon.
"It's very fragile. It's very valuable and it's really a one of a kind piece," said the library's Executive Director Reff. She has been working to establish the provenance of this case and it looks like it really did belong to Napoleon, whose family and supporters had ties to the north country.
"A lot of Napoleon's officers came here and they built him a house in Cape Vincent because they were going to rescue him from exile," she said.
Napoleon never set foot in the U.S. but it looks like his travel kit made the trip without him. It's locked in a very old protective case, which Reff believes has never been opened.

http://www.wwnytv.com/news/local/Treasu ... 67021.html

Sarah
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Re: Napoleon's travel case found in American library

Postby Jerry » November 29th, 2015, 10:39 am

Interesting story Sarah, thanks.

I didn't know about the house in Cape Vincent, but I remember reading that in the early years after his St Helena exile, there was quite a lot of interest from his supporters in mounting a rescue to the Americas. Napoleon was quite lightly guarded and this was thought quite feasible. I seem to remember reading though that Napoleon himself was against it - he was supposedly concerned about assassination attempts by Bourbon supporters, and thought he was safer where he was. Ironically one of the theories about his death is chronic poisoning (to look like progressive illness) by a covert Royalist on St Helena with him - Count de Montholon being the usual suspect.

http://www.napoleon.org/en/reading_room ... mperor.asp

Not really looking to open a discussion on this as it has been pretty widely aired over the years, and personally I think the post mortem evidence of gastric cancer is quite convincing.

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