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The Napoleonic Wars 1792-1815

The American War of Independence and the French Revolution

For all discussions relating to the background and causes of the Napoleonic Wars including the French Revolution of 1789-1799.

Re: The American War of Independence and the French Revoluti

Postby TheBibliophile » November 8th, 2015, 10:56 pm

Senarmont198 wrote:The pardon of the emigres was to both noble and non-noble. And many of the nobles decided to serve Napoleon after they returned.

I didnt say it wasnt... of course some also never left and served.
I always find it interesting that people like David Chandler continue to propogate the myth that old boney was some sort of champion of liberty and democracy.
Is it a view held by a majority across the pond, do you think?
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Re: The American War of Independence and the French Revoluti

Postby Senarmont198 » November 8th, 2015, 11:10 pm

Who ever said that Napoleon was a 'champion of democracy'?

Do you have a citation for Chandler saying that?

Napoleon as head of state did, however, preserve the social gains of the Revolution and where his rule was in effect basic civil rights and the rule of law was in effect also.

Using 'democracy' as a rule of thumb for Europe, or for that matter the United States, in the late 18th and early 19th century is a fool's errand-it did not exist. The United States was a republic and Britain's parliament was corrupt and progressively repressive during the period.
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Re: The American War of Independence and the French Revoluti

Postby TheBibliophile » November 8th, 2015, 11:13 pm

Senarmont198 wrote:Who ever said that Napoleon was a 'champion of democracy'?

Do you have a citation for Chandler saying that?

Napoleon as head of state did, however, preserve the social gains of the Revolution and where his rule was in effect basic civil rights and the rule of law was in effect also.

Using 'democracy' as a rule of thumb for Europe, or for that matter the United States, in the late 18th and early 19th century is a fool's errand-it did not exist. The United States was a republic and Britain's parliament was corrupt and progressively repressive during the period.


I don't need a citation, ive seen plenty of DVDs in which Chandler is interviewed. He is not impartial, his pro-bonaparte bias is clear, youd have to be in denial not to see it.
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Re: The American War of Independence and the French Revoluti

Postby Senarmont198 » November 9th, 2015, 1:24 am

All authors have either a favorite or a bias. The good ones still produce good history.
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