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The Napoleonic Wars 1792-1815

United Irishmen 1798

For all discussions regarding other related conflicts during the Napoleonic period not covered by the above (e.g. Irish Rebellion of 1798 and India 1799-1804 etc.)

United Irishmen 1798

Postby Connaught » August 26th, 2011, 9:13 pm

Brief breakdowns of the United Irishmen's Rebellion of 1798:

The 1798 Rebellion was the most widespread of all the Irish Rebellions. Eleven counties in Ulster, Leinster and Connacht rose against English rule over six months in 1798, leaving 30,000 dead.

'The United Irishmen' were inspired by the revolutionary ideas of the 1789 French Revolution. They were founded in Belfast in 1791 and later in Dublin with the aims of catholic emancipation and parliamentary reform. By 1794, the movement was driven underground. Its leader, Theobald Wolfe Tone had gone to seek French help in securing a revolution. Other prominent men of the movement included Belfast Presbyterians such as Henry Joy McCracken and Dublin's Lord Edward Fitzgerald. The masses that made up the bulk of the United Army were Catholic. The United Irishmen may have numbered as high as 100,000 and were arranged by county, barony and parish.


http://homepage.eircom.net/~tipperaryfame/rebel798.htm

George Crawford

"had formerly served in the 5th Dragoons, retired on a pension, and was a permanent sergeant in Captain Taylor's corp of yeomen cavalry. He, his wife, and granddaughter, were stopped by a party of rebels, as they were endeavoring to escape, and were reproached with the appellation of heretics, because they wer eof the Protestant religion. One of them struck his wife with a musket, and another gave her a stab of a pike in the back, with an intent to murder her. Her husband, having endeavored to save her, was knocked down, and received several blows of a firelock, which disabled him from making his escape. While they were disputing whether they should kill, them, his wife stole behind a hedge, and concealed herself. They then massacred her husband with pikes; and her granddaughter, having thrown herself on his body to protect him, received so many wounds that she instantly expired."


http://maggieblanck.com/Mayopages/1798.html

The Rebellion of 1798 was the bloodiest conflict in modern Irish history. It broke out on the night of 23 May of that year when small crowds of men set out from the poor districts of the city of Dublin to seize the Castle and other key public buildings. The rebels were inspired largely by the example of the French Revolution and their ambition was to overthrow the British-dominated Irish government and establish an independent republic, modeled on that of France, in its place. The quick victory some of them expected was not to be. The authorities had infiltrated their revolutionary organization, the United Irishmen, and had already arrested several of their key leaders, Lord Edward FitzGerald being the most important of them. The militia mobilized before the rebels could assemble in large groups and what their leaders had hoped would be an almost bloodless coup turned into a debacle. Their followers gave up without a fight, abandoned their weapons in the streets and drifted back into the various parts of the city from which they had come.

http://multitext.ucc.ie/d/The_1798_Rebellion_in_Wexford
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Re: United Irishmen 1798

Postby sbasdeo1 » February 11th, 2012, 8:33 pm

Thomas Pakenham has written a great book called:
Year of Liberty: The Great Irish Rebellion 1798

Definitely a recommended read!
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Re: United Irishmen 1798

Postby TheBibliophile » February 11th, 2012, 8:47 pm

Im not quite sure if its true to say that the vast majority of the United Irishmen were catholic..... it was a cross community organisation which included the apprentice boys and was actually started by protestants as far as I am aware....
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Re: United Irishmen 1798

Postby sbasdeo1 » February 11th, 2012, 9:30 pm

Wolf-Tone was a Protestant as were most of the UI. As far as I was aware they only later tried to enlist support among Catholics by pressing for catholic Emancipation.
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Re: United Irishmen 1798

Postby TheBibliophile » February 11th, 2012, 10:12 pm

Yup, Wolfe Tone was certainly protestant....
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