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'Horse Guards'

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'Horse Guards'

Postby jf42 » July 19th, 2016, 5:42 pm

In what period date did 'Horse Guards' come to be used as the short hand for the Commander-in Chief's office in Whitehall. Was it before or after the completion of the current buildings in the 1750s?
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Re: 'Horse Guards'

Postby Peter » July 20th, 2016, 6:27 am

jf,

The answer to your question: Yes!

Given I don’t know how literal you intend to be with your ‘terms’, I’ll offer these and let you decide:

i) “Another development of the seventeenth century provides a lighter theme.” [p 29]

“The second half of that century saw the beginning of many names that are still familiar, or even famous, in modern London…………………………………..
……. among the many familiar titles first heard in this era of new creation, our particular theme is the name "The Horse Guards." [p 30]

“The ground now known as "The Horse Guards Parade" was part of a space then called the Tiltyard. In Tudor times it was a real tilt-yard, where the Court could step from the Palace of Whitehall to applaud the exploits of nobles and gentry in various contests of skill-at-arms. Long years before the Restoration all such jousting had ceased to be held; and here was a space where the King's guard could [p 30] be housed conveniently near to the Palace. Quarters were required for the mounted troops which Charles II had been allowed to keep, and barracks and stables were built in the Tiltyard, henceforth to be known as "The Horse Guards, Whitehall". It was here, before the end of the century, that the Secretary-at-War had his modest office.” [p 31]

""The Horse Guards, Whitehall" of those days was not, of course, the present building. After a hundred years of use the old buildings were pulled down and their place was taken by William Kent's unpretentious but pleasing edifice. For long "The Horse Guards'* was the War Office, or at least was so regarded by all. At a later stage the name was used to refer to the office of the Commander-in-Chief as opposed to the civil control of the Army." [p 31]

Gordon, Hampden (Assistant Secretary at the War Office), The War Office, London, Putnam, 1935. http://archive.org/details/waroffice032377mbp.

ii) “When the building in Whitehall was first partially used as the offices of the War Department, the command of the Army was in the hands of Lord Ligonier.” [p 9]

It does not appear that, one hundred and twenty years ago, "the Horse-Guards" was the head-quarters of the Commander-in-Chief, for all Lord Ligonier's orders were dated from "Knightsbridge Barracks." The Secretary for War, however, issued Orders and Warrants from the Horse-Guards, and seemed indeed to perform a large part of those functions which, at a later period, were transferred to the Commander-in-Chief.” [p 12]

Stocqueler, JH, A Personal History of the Horse-guards from 1750 to 1872, London, Hurst and Blackett, 1873. https://archive.org/details/apersonalhistor01stocgoog,

Regards,
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Re: 'Horse Guards'

Postby jf42 » July 20th, 2016, 8:27 am

Peter- hello

That's just the ticket.

Thank you

JF
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Re: 'Horse Guards'

Postby Senarmont198 » July 23rd, 2016, 4:28 pm

When in London in August 1994 my wife and I saw the Changing of the Guard at Horse Guards Parade which was impressive. I enjoyed it much more than the one at Buckingham Palace that we went to afterwards.
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Re: 'Horse Guards'

Postby Josh&Historyland » July 23rd, 2016, 7:15 pm

In general I think the parade drill was much better during the 1920s-50s. A tad stompy for my taste nowadays, speaking from a purely superficial point of view.
Adventures In Historyland, Keeping History Real. http://adventuresinhistoryland.wordpress.com/
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Re: 'Horse Guards'

Postby jf42 » July 24th, 2016, 3:28 pm

Ah, Josh, the peach tinted prism of your boyhood memories
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Re: 'Horse Guards'

Postby Josh&Historyland » July 24th, 2016, 3:49 pm

:D *polishes rose coloured spectacles*
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Re: 'Horse Guards'

Postby janner » July 25th, 2016, 4:22 am

Josh&Historyland wrote:In general I think the parade drill was much better during the 1920s-50s. A tad stompy for my taste nowadays, speaking from a purely superficial point of view.


1820-50s surely ;)
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